How Animals Help Veterans Overcome

This being the 4th of July and the anniversary of America’s Independence  … today we highlight two programs focused on serving our military veterans … along with additional research necessary to ensure optimized care:

Programs for Veterans

 

1.) Paws for Purple Hearts

Paws for Purple Hearts builds on the time-honored tradition of Warriors assisting other Warriors. It helps heal our returning combat Veterans by teaching those with psychological scars, including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), to train service dogs for their comrades with combat-related injuries.

Video from the Paws for Purple Hearts program website:

 

To learn more click on the following:

160704 paws for purple hearts

 


2.) K9s For Warriors

 K9s For Warriors is dedicated to providing service canines to our warriors suffering from Post-traumatic Stress Disability, traumatic brain injury and/or military sexual trauma as a result of military service post 9/11. Our goal is to empower them to return to civilian life with dignity and independence. K9s For Warriors is a tax-exempt 501(C)(3) nonprofit organization.

From their site:

K9s For Warriors is Responsible, Efficient, and Effective …

Responsible

95% of dogs used in K9s For Warriors program are rescue/shelter dogs.

Efficient

Corporate sponsors fund our operating costs, while 100% of individual donations are program direct.

Effective

K9s For Warriors has graduated 236 Warrior-K9 teams, with a 90% recertification rate.

To get involved click the following:

160704 K9s for Warriors.png


 

New studies focus on service dogs and PTSD

“The VA’s most recent regulations on service animals say they would fund them for physical disability but not for mental disabilities because they said there wasn’t enough scientific evidence that shows animals help with PTSD,” according to Stave Feldman, executive director of the Human Animal Bond Research Institute Foundation.

New research could inform the Veterans Affairs Department, which provides service dogs to former troops with certain physical disabilities but not those with mental health disorders and steer the department toward appropriate policy changes.

Learn more about Purdue University study

 


Honor and Support

Let’s honor and support those who have served and do so with optimal research, compassion, humanity, and with well cared for healthy animals …

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